Posts Tagged 'HCV'

Hepatitis C not a barrier for organ transplantation, study finds

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From NPR science correspondent Richard Harris:

Donated organs from people who were infected with the hepatitis C virus can be safely transplanted, according to the latest in a line of studies that are building a case for using these organs.

Typically, these organs have been discarded because of concerns about spreading the viral infection. But a study of heart and lung transplants published Wednesday by the New England Journal of Medicine finds that new antiviral drugs are so effective that the recipients ...

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Hepatitis C-positive Heart Transplants: Safer After All?

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As of July 5, 2018, there are 3,960 people in the United States on the waitlist for a heart transplant. That’s only a fraction of the 114,554 people who need organ transplants. There is a great need for organ donations, and physicians at the University of Washington Medical Center have initiated a protocol to help with that.

The UW heart transplant team, led by Dr. Jason Smith, the associate surgical director of heart transplantation and a cardiac surgeon, plans to transplant hearts from ...

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Education Corner – Hepatitis C Positive Organ Donors – Is That Possible?

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Hepatitis C Positive Organ Donors – Is That Possible? – (Download PDF Version)

About the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)

  • RNA (ribonucleic acid) viral infection
  • Causes liver inflammation and can cause severe liver damage
  • Spread through contaminated blood
  • Half of people infected with HCV are asymptomatic and do not know they are infected

Symptoms Can Include:

  • Almost always only ...
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Newer drugs make hepatitis C-positive kidneys safe for transplant

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People who received kidneys from donors infected with hepatitis C did not become ill with the virus, thanks to treatment with newer drugs that can cure the disease, a small study reports.

Ten patients not previously infected with hepatitis C took doses of powerful antiviral medications before and after receiving the transplants. None of the patients developed chronic infections, researchers report online March 6 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The finding could help make more kidneys available for transplants.

“If this increases access ...

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DAAs prove effective for HCV-infected heart transplant patients

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Direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs proved safe and effective for hepatitis C (HCV) patients who had undergone heart transplants, according to new research.

Jia-Horng Kao, MD, PhD, FAASLD, and a team from the National Taiwan University Hospital in Taipei, found that 12 individuals given sofosbuvir combined with ledipasvir (Harvoni) or sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) combined with daclatasvir (Daklinza) achieved a sustained virologic response rate of 100% after 12 weeks.

Interferon-free DAAs have shown excellent efficacy and safety for ordinary patients with chronic HCV infection, the researchers ...

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In some patients, hepatitis C best treated after transplant

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Direct-acting antiviral drugs can eradicate the hepatitis C virus, even in patients with advanced liver decompensation. But their outcomes may be better if treatment occurs after transplant, according to a recent study looking at this issue.

The goal of the study was to determine when life expectancy was improved with DAA treatment, before or after liver transplant. One reason these may differ is that the trade-off for improved liver function with early treatment is the risk for delay—or even delisting for ...

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HCV drugs may slash wait times for transplants

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Imagine this: You’re treating a patient with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who has been on the kidney transplant list for almost a year. That’s not a surprising delay; more than 100,000 people are on the waiting list nationwide, and the median wait time is now over 3.5 years. So your patient probably has at least two more years to wait—years of dialysis in which he might become too sick to receive that transplant or die before it becomes available. (More ...

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